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Immediate postpartum use of long-acting reversible contraceptives in low- and middle-income countries

Overview of attention for article published in Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, December 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
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Title
Immediate postpartum use of long-acting reversible contraceptives in low- and middle-income countries
Published in
Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40748-017-0063-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Margo S. Harrison, Robert L. Goldenberg

Abstract

Globally, data show that many women of reproductive age desire to use modern family planning methods. Many of these women do not have access to modern contraceptives, which is termed their 'unmet need' for contraception. In low- and middle-income countries where total fertility rates can be high and many women have undesired fertility, or wish to increase their inter-pregnancy intervals, access to modern contraceptives is often inadequate. The puerperium is a unique time for interventions to offer modern contraceptive methods. Having just given birth, women may desire contraceptives to prevent short-interval pregnancy, or further pregnancy, altogether. In high-, middle-, and low-income countries there has been an increased interest in the placement of long-acting reversible contraceptives at or immediately after delivery, regardless of delivery mode. These methods can provide women with highly effective contraception for years, can be manufactured at low cost, are generally well tolerated with a good safety profile, and do not require the user to remember to take them. Oral contraceptives and injectable medications require the patient to present to the clinic during a specific timeframe for follow-up care or a refill, and the clinic may not be proximate, affordable, or have the desired contraceptive in stock. This document will review the currently published literature on the use of immediate postpartum long-acting reversible contraceptives (placed within two days of delivery) in low- and middle-income countries to report on the prevalence of use and satisfaction rates, and note the lack of data on cost and economic implications. We will also explore data on how future maternal, neonatal, and infant outcomes may be influenced by increased peripartum long-term contraceptive use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 23%
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Postgraduate 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 10 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 18%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 12 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,746,665
of 12,930,816 outputs
Outputs from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#22
of 52 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,107
of 384,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#8
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,930,816 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 52 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 384,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.