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Follow-up of a healthy lifestyle education program (the EdAl study): four years after cessation of randomized controlled trial intervention

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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74 Mendeley
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Title
Follow-up of a healthy lifestyle education program (the EdAl study): four years after cessation of randomized controlled trial intervention
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-5006-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisabet Llauradó, Lucia Tarro, David Moriña, Magaly Aceves-Martins, Montse Giralt, Rosa Solà

Abstract

An important challenge of school-based childhood obesity (OB) intervention programs is understanding the maintenance of the effects after cessation of the intervention to overcome the limitations of follow-up studies. The aim of this study is to verify the sustainability of the benefits achieved at a 4-year follow-up of the post-Educació en Alimentació (EDAl) program intervention cessation by assessing the OB-related outcomes and lifestyles of 13- to 15-year-old adolescents. This paper describes a 4-year follow-up study after the cessation of a school-based randomized controlled intervention in adolescents (n = 349, intervention; n = 154, control) with baseline and 4-year follow-up data from high schools in Reus (intervention group), Salou, Cambrils and Vila-seca (control group). The outcomes are body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score, and OB prevalence according to the World Health Organization and International Obesity Task Force criteria and lifestyle data (obtained from questionnaires). Compared with the control girls, the intervention girls showed reduced BMI z-scores (-0.33 units, p < 0.01) from baseline (2007) to the 4-year follow-up post-intervention (2014). Compared with the control boys, the intervention boys showed reduced OB prevalence (-7.7%; p = 0.02). Compared with the control boys, more boys in the intervention group (19% increase; p = 0.059) showed ≥4 h/week after-school physical activity (PA). A decrease in the consumption of dairy products, fruits and fish was observed in both groups. At the 4-year post-intervention follow-up of the EdAl program, compared with the control groups, girls had lower BMI z-scores and boys had lower OB prevalence from the intervention. The encouragement in after-school PA was long-lasting and maintained after the cessation of the intervention, whereas healthy food habits must be further reinforced in adolescents. ISRCTN29247645 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 74 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 27%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 17 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 16 22%
Sports and Recreations 10 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 8%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 22 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2019.
All research outputs
#3,618,685
of 14,122,258 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,970
of 9,722 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,596
of 397,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#312
of 668 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,122,258 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,722 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,569 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 668 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.