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Dual IRE 1 RN ase functions dictate glioblastoma development

Overview of attention for article published in EMBO Molecular Medicine, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
37 tweeters
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
103 Mendeley
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Title
Dual IRE 1 RN ase functions dictate glioblastoma development
Published in
EMBO Molecular Medicine, January 2018
DOI 10.15252/emmm.201707929
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stéphanie Lhomond, Tony Avril, Nicolas Dejeans, Konstantinos Voutetakis, Dimitrios Doultsinos, Mari McMahon, Raphaël Pineau, Joanna Obacz, Olga Papadodima, Florence Jouan, Heloise Bourien, Marianthi Logotheti, Gwénaële Jégou, Néstor Pallares‐Lupon, Kathleen Schmit, Pierre‐Jean Le Reste, Amandine Etcheverry, Jean Mosser, Kim Barroso, Elodie Vauléon, Marion Maurel, Afshin Samali, John B Patterson, Olivier Pluquet, Claudio Hetz, Véronique Quillien, Aristotelis Chatziioannou, Eric Chevet

Abstract

Proteostasis imbalance is emerging as a major hallmark of cancer, driving tumor aggressiveness. Evidence suggests that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a major site for protein folding and quality control, plays a critical role in cancer development. This concept is valid in glioblastoma multiform (GBM), the most lethal primary brain cancer with no effective treatment. We previously demonstrated that the ER stress sensor IRE1α (referred to as IRE1) contributes to GBM progression, through XBP1 mRNA splicing and regulated IRE1-dependent decay (RIDD) of RNA Here, we first demonstrated IRE1 signaling significance to human GBM and defined specific IRE1-dependent gene expression signatures that were confronted to human GBM transcriptomes. This approach allowed us to demonstrate the antagonistic roles of XBP1 mRNA splicing and RIDD on tumor outcomes, mainly through selective remodeling of the tumor stroma. This study provides the first demonstration of a dual role of IRE1 downstream signaling in cancer and opens a new therapeutic window to abrogate tumor progression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 37 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 103 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 27%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 10%
Student > Master 9 9%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 22 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 11%
Neuroscience 4 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 4%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 27 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2021.
All research outputs
#834,217
of 18,209,496 outputs
Outputs from EMBO Molecular Medicine
#194
of 1,242 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,522
of 418,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EMBO Molecular Medicine
#7
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,209,496 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,242 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 418,897 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.