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Resource competition model predicts zonation and increasing nutrient use efficiency along a wetland salinity gradient

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, January 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Resource competition model predicts zonation and increasing nutrient use efficiency along a wetland salinity gradient
Published in
Ecology, January 2018
DOI 10.1002/ecy.2131
Pubmed ID
Authors

Donald R. Schoolmaster, Camille L. Stagg

Abstract

A trade-off between competitive ability and stress tolerance has been hypothesized and empirically supported to explain the zonation of species across stress gradients for a number of systems. Since stress often reduces plant productivity, one might expect a pattern of decreasing productivity across the zones of the stress gradient. However, this pattern is often not observed in coastal wetlands that show patterns of zonation along a salinity gradient. To address the potentially complex relationship between stress, zonation and productivity in coastal wetlands, we developed a model of plant biomass as a function of resource competition and salinity stress. Analysis of the model confirms the conventional wisdom that a trade-off between competitive ability and stress tolerance is a necessary condition for zonation. It also suggests that a negative relationship between salinity and production can be overcome if 1) the supply of the limiting resource increases with greater salinity stress or 2) nutrient use efficiency increases with increasing salinity. We fit the equilibrium solution of the dynamic model to data from Louisiana coastal wetlands to test its ability to explain patterns of production across the landscape gradient and derive predictions that could be tested with independent data. We found support for a number of the model predictions, including patterns of decreasing competitive ability and increasing nutrient use efficiency across a gradient from freshwater to saline wetlands. In addition to providing a quantitative framework to support the mechanistic hypotheses of zonation, these results suggest that this simple model is a useful platform to further build upon, simulate and test mechanistic hypotheses of more complex patterns and phenomena in coastal wetlands. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Student > Master 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 41%
Environmental Science 7 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,055,980
of 22,541,222 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#3,064
of 6,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,396
of 406,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#72
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,541,222 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,489 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 406,504 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.