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Deciphering the nature of the coral–Chromera association

Overview of attention for article published in ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
63 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
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Title
Deciphering the nature of the coral–Chromera association
Published in
ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, January 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41396-017-0005-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amin R Mohamed, Vivian R Cumbo, Saki Harii, Chuya Shinzato, Cheong Xin Chan, Mark A Ragan, Nori Satoh, Eldon E Ball, David J Miller

Abstract

Since the discovery of Chromera velia as a novel coral-associated microalga, this organism has attracted interest because of its unique evolutionary position between the photosynthetic dinoflagellates and the parasitic apicomplexans. The nature of the relationship between Chromera and its coral host is controversial. Is it a mutualism, from which both participants benefit, a parasitic relationship, or a chance association? To better understand the interaction, larvae of the common Indo-Pacific reef-building coral Acropora digitifera were experimentally infected with Chromera, and the impact on the host transcriptome was assessed at 4, 12, and 48 h post-infection using Illumina RNA-Seq technology. The transcriptomic response of the coral to Chromera was complex and implies that host immunity is strongly suppressed, and both phagosome maturation and the apoptotic machinery is modified. These responses differ markedly from those described for infection with a competent strain of the coral mutualist Symbiodinium, instead resembling those of vertebrate hosts to parasites and/or pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Consistent with ecological studies suggesting that the association may be accidental, the transcriptional response of A. digitifera larvae leads us to conclude that Chromera could be a coral parasite, commensal, or accidental bystander, but certainly not a beneficial mutualist.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 63 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Student > Master 7 13%
Professor 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 49%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 15%
Environmental Science 6 11%
Chemistry 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 8 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 36. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2018.
All research outputs
#656,517
of 16,729,962 outputs
Outputs from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#302
of 2,547 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,597
of 412,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#16
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,729,962 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,547 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 412,902 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.