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Phylogenetic relationships within the Alcidae (Charadriiformes: Aves) inferred from total molecular evidence

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Biology and Evolution, February 1996
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Title
Phylogenetic relationships within the Alcidae (Charadriiformes: Aves) inferred from total molecular evidence
Published in
Molecular Biology and Evolution, February 1996
DOI 10.1093/oxfordjournals.molbev.a025595
Pubmed ID
Authors

V. L. Friesen, A. J. Baker, J. F. Piatt

Abstract

The Alcidae is a unique assemblage of Northern Hemisphere seabirds that forage by "flying" underwater. Despite obvious affinities among the species, their evolutionary relationships are unclear. We analyzed nucleotide sequences of 1,045 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and allelic profiles for 37 allozyme loci in all 22 extant species. Trees were constructed on independent and combined data sets using maximum parsimony and distance methods that correct for superimposed changes. Alternative methods of analysis produced only minor differences in relationships that were supported strongly by bootstrapping or standard error tests. Combining sequence and allozyme data into a single analysis provided the greatest number of relationships receiving strong support. Addition of published morphological and ecological data did not improve support for any additional relationship. All analyses grouped species into six distinct lineages: (1) the dovekie (Alle alle) and auks, (2) guillemots, (3) brachyramphine murrelets, (4) synthliboramphine murrelets, (5) true auklets, and (6) the rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata) and puffins. The two murres (genus Uria) were sister taxa, and the black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) was basal to the other guillemots. The Asian subspecies of the marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus perdix) was the most divergent brachyramphine murrelet, and two distinct lineages occurred within the synthliboramphine murrelets. Cassin's auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) and the rhinoceros auklet were basal to the other auklets and puffins, respectively, and the Atlantic (Fratercula arctica) and horned (Fratercula corniculata) puffins were sister taxa. Several relationships among tribes, among the dovekie and auks, and among the auklets could not be resolved but resembled "star" phylogenies indicative of adaptive radiations at different depths within the trees.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 2 3%
Spain 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Norway 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Unknown 71 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 24%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Master 13 16%
Professor 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Other 16 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 70%
Environmental Science 9 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 9%
Unspecified 3 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 1%
Other 4 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2017.
All research outputs
#3,426,756
of 12,029,028 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Biology and Evolution
#1,817
of 3,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,138
of 274,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Biology and Evolution
#47
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,029,028 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,320 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,072 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.