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Does cognitive behavioral therapy alter mental defeat and cognitive flexibility in patients with panic disorder?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2018
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Title
Does cognitive behavioral therapy alter mental defeat and cognitive flexibility in patients with panic disorder?
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3130-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shinobu Nagata, Yoichi Seki, Takayuki Shibuya, Mizue Yokoo, Tomokazu Murata, Yoichi Hiramatsu, Fuminori Yamada, Hanae Ibuki, Noriko Minamitani, Naoki Yoshinaga, Muga Kusunoki, Yasushi Inada, Nobuko Kawasoe, Soichiro Adachi, Keiko Oshiro, Daisuke Matsuzawa, Yoshiyuki Hirano, Kensuke Yoshimura, Michiko Nakazato, Masaomi Iyo, Akiko Nakagawa, Eiji Shimizu

Abstract

Mental defeat and cognitive flexibility have been studied as explanatory factors for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. This study examined mental defeat and cognitive flexibility scores in patients with panic disorder (PD) before and after cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and compared them to those of a gender- and age-matched healthy control group. Patients with PD (n = 15) received 16 weekly individual CBT sessions, and the control group (n = 35) received no treatment. Patients completed the Mental Defeat Scale and the Cognitive Flexibility Scale before the intervention, following eight CBT sessions, and following 16 CBT sessions, while the control group did so only prior to receiving CBT (baseline). The patients' pre-CBT Mental Defeat and Cognitive Flexibility Scale scores were significantly higher on the Mental Defeat Scale and lower on the Cognitive Flexibility Scale than those of the control group participants were. In addition, the average Mental Defeat Scale scores of the patients decreased significantly, from 22.2 to 12.4, while their average Cognitive Flexibility Scale scores increased significantly, from 42.8 to 49.5. These results suggest that CBT can reduce mental defeat and increase cognitive flexibility in patients with PD Trial registration The study was registered retrospectively in the national UMIN Clinical Trials Registry on June 10, 2016 (registration ID: UMIN000022693).

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Other 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Librarian 2 7%
Other 8 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 18 67%
Unspecified 3 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2018.
All research outputs
#11,200,334
of 12,585,503 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#2,356
of 2,836 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#322,496
of 381,892 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#330
of 404 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 404 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.