↓ Skip to main content

Childhood trajectories of peer victimization and prediction of mental health outcomes in midadolescence: a longitudinal population-based study

Overview of attention for article published in CMAJ, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 5,029)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
51 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
87 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
4 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Childhood trajectories of peer victimization and prediction of mental health outcomes in midadolescence: a longitudinal population-based study
Published in
CMAJ, January 2018
DOI 10.1503/cmaj.170219
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marie-Claude Geoffroy, Michel Boivin, Louise Arseneault, Johanne Renaud, Léa C. Perret, Gustavo Turecki, Gregory Michel, Julie Salla, Frank Vitaro, Mara Brendgen, Richard E. Tremblay, Sylvana M. Côté

Abstract

Exposure to peer victimization is relatively common. However, little is known about its developmental course and its effect on impairment associated with mental illnesses. We aimed to identify groups of children following differential trajectories of peer victimization from ages 6 to 13 years and to examine predictive associations of these trajectories with mental health in adolescence. Participants were members of the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, a prospective cohort of 2120 children born in 1997/98 who were followed until age 15 years. We included 1363 participants with self-reported victimization from ages 6 to 13 years and data available on their mental health status at 15 years. We identified 3 trajectories of peer victimization. The 2 prevailing groups were participants with little or moderate exposure to victimization (441/1685 [26.2%] and 1000/1685 [59.3%], respectively); the third group (244 [14.5%]) had been chronically exposed to the most severe and long-lasting levels of victimization. The most severely victimized individuals had greater odds of reporting debilitating depressive or dysthymic symptoms (odds ratio [OR] 2.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-5.17), debilitating generalized anxiety problems (OR 3.27, CI 1.64-6.51) and suicidality (OR 3.46, CI 1.53-7.81) at 15 years than those exposed to the lowest levels of victimization, after adjustment for sex, childhood mental health, family hardship and victimization perpetration. The association with suicidality remained significant after controlling for concurrent symptoms of depression or dysthymia and generalized anxiety problems. Adolescents who were most severely victimized by peers had an increased risk of experiencing severe symptoms consistent with mental health problems. Given that peer victimization trajectories are established early on, interventions to reduce the risk of being victimized should start before enrolment in the formal school system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 87 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 50%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 25%
Student > Postgraduate 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 3 75%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 471. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2018.
All research outputs
#11,567
of 9,088,906 outputs
Outputs from CMAJ
#21
of 5,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#610
of 223,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age from CMAJ
#2
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,088,906 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,029 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,097 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.