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Resistance to malaria in humans: the impact of strong, recent selection

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, October 2012
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  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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118 Mendeley
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Title
Resistance to malaria in humans: the impact of strong, recent selection
Published in
Malaria Journal, October 2012
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-11-349
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip W Hedrick

Abstract

Malaria is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and has been suggested as the most potent type of selection in humans in recent millennia. As a result, genes involved in malaria resistance are excellent examples of recent, strong selection. In 1949, Haldane initially suggested that infectious disease could be a strong selective force in human populations. Evidence for the strong selective effect of malaria resistance includes the high frequency of a number of detrimental genetic diseases caused by the pleiotropic effects of these malaria resistance variants, many of which are "loss of function" mutants. Evidence that this selection is recent comes from the genetic dating of the age of a number of these malaria resistant alleles to less than 5,000 years before the present, generally much more recent than other human genetic variants. An approach to estimate selection coefficients from contemporary case-control data is presented. In the situations described here, selection is much greater than 1%, significantly higher than generally observed for other human genetic variation. With these selection coefficients, predictions are generated about the joint change of alleles S and C at the β-globin locus, and for α-thalassaemia haplotypes and S, variants that are unlinked but exhibit epistasis. Population genetics can be used to determine the amount and pattern of selection in the past and predict selection in the future for other malaria resistance variants as they are discovered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 3%
Panama 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Unknown 109 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 20%
Student > Bachelor 23 19%
Student > Master 22 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 17%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 6 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 15%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Chemistry 3 3%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 9 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2019.
All research outputs
#4,287,207
of 15,904,106 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,318
of 4,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,966
of 289,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#7
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,904,106 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,495 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,982 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.