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Baseline Mobility is Not Associated with Decline in Cognitive Function in Healthy Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Findings From The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA)

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, April 2018
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Title
Baseline Mobility is Not Associated with Decline in Cognitive Function in Healthy Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Findings From The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA)
Published in
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, April 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.11.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Orna Donoghue, Joanne Feeney, Neil O'Leary, Rose Anne Kenny

Abstract

Few studies examine the relationship between Timed Up-and-Go (TUG), a commonly used clinical test, and cognitive decline. This study examines whether TUG, usual gait speed (UGS), and dual-task gait speed (DTGS) predict decline in global cognition, executive function, processing speed, memory, and attention with follow-up of up to 5.9 years. Longitudinal study. The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), a nationally representative cohort study. Community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years, with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score ≥18 and no known history of memory impairment, dementia, Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease were included (N = 2,250). Participants completed mobility tasks during the baseline health assessment and cognitive tasks during interviews conducted at 2 year intervals (waves 1, 2, and 3) and health assessments (waves 1 and 3). Linear and Poisson mixed effects regression models were used to examine longitudinal associations between mobility and each cognitive test, adjusting for sociodemographics and physical and mental health. There was little evidence of an association between TUG, UGS, or DTGS with decline in cognitive function after adjusting for confounders. These mobility tasks are not sensitive predictors of cognitive decline in this high-functioning, community-dwelling sample; nonetheless, limited decline in cognitive function was observed during follow-up. Further work with longer follow-up and/or analysis of more specific and comprehensive measures associated with gait is required.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 12 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 23%
Psychology 11 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Neuroscience 4 7%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 14 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2017.
All research outputs
#11,033,281
of 12,413,763 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
#1,355
of 1,566 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#285,943
of 339,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
#72
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,413,763 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,017 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.