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Lingual Gyrus Surface Area Is Associated with Anxiety-Depression Severity in Young Adults: A Genetic Clustering Approach

Overview of attention for article published in eNeuro, January 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

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7 tweeters

Citations

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Title
Lingual Gyrus Surface Area Is Associated with Anxiety-Depression Severity in Young Adults: A Genetic Clustering Approach
Published in
eNeuro, January 2018
DOI 10.1523/eneuro.0153-17.2017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Baptiste Couvy-Duchesne, Lachlan T. Strike, Greig I. de Zubicaray, Katie L. McMahon, Paul M. Thompson, Ian B. Hickie, Nicholas G. Martin, Margaret J. Wright

Abstract

Here we aimed to identify cortical endophenotypes for anxiety-depression. Our data-driven approach used vertex-wise genetic correlations (estimated from a twin sample: 157 monozygotic and 194 dizygotic twin pairs) to parcellate cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA) into genetically homogeneous regions (Chen et al., 2013). In an overlapping twin and sibling sample (n = 834; aged 15-29, 66% female), in those with anxiety-depression Somatic and Psychological Health Report (SPHERE) scores (Hickie et al., 2001) above median, we found a reduction of SA in an occipito-temporal cluster, which comprised part of the right lingual, fusiform and parahippocampal gyrii. A similar reduction was observed in the Human Connectome Project (HCP) sample (n = 890, age 22-37, 56.5% female) in those with Adult Self Report (ASR) DSM-oriented scores (Achenbach et al., 2005) in the 25-95% quantiles. A post hoc vertex-wise analysis identified the right lingual and, to a lesser extent the fusiform gyrus. Overall, the surface reduction explained by the anxiety-depression scores was modest (r = -0.10, 3rd order spline, and r = -0.040, 1st order spline in the HCP). The discordant results in the top 5% of the anxiety-depression scores may be explained by differences in recruitment between the studies. However, we could not conclude whether this cortical region was an endophenotype for anxiety-depression as the genetic correlations did not reach significance, which we attribute to the modest effect size (post hoc statistical power <10%).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 5 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 7 30%
Unspecified 6 26%
Neuroscience 5 22%
Engineering 2 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2019.
All research outputs
#6,991,774
of 13,199,565 outputs
Outputs from eNeuro
#609
of 987 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,494
of 345,756 outputs
Outputs of similar age from eNeuro
#234
of 314 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,199,565 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 987 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,756 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 314 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.