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A cor da dor: iniquidades raciais na atenção pré-natal e ao parto no Brasil

Overview of attention for article published in Cadernos de Saúde Pública, January 2017
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Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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129 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages
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2 video uploaders

Citations

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43 Dimensions

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113 Mendeley
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Title
A cor da dor: iniquidades raciais na atenção pré-natal e ao parto no Brasil
Published in
Cadernos de Saúde Pública, January 2017
DOI 10.1590/0102-311x00078816
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria do Carmo Leal, Silvana Granado Nogueira da Gama, Ana Paula Esteves Pereira, Vanessa Eufrauzino Pacheco, Cleber Nascimento do Carmo, Ricardo Ventura Santos

Abstract

Few studies on the influence of race/color on pregnancy and birthcare experiences have been carried out in Brazil. Additionally, none of the existing studies are of national scope. This study sought to evaluate inequities in prenatal and childbirth care according to race/color using propensity score matching. The data comes from the study Birth in Brazil: National Survey into Labor and Birth, a national population study comprised of interviews and revisions of medical records that included 23,894 women in 2011/2012. We used logistic regressions to estimate odds ratios (OR) and respective 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of race/color associated with the outcomes were analyzed. When compared with white-skinned women, black-skinned women were more likely to have inadequate prenatal care (OR = 1.6; 95%CI: 1.4-1.9), to not be linked to a maternity hospital for childbirth (OR = 1.2 95%CI: 1.1-1.4), to be without a companion (OR = 1.7; 95%CI: 1.4-2.0), to seek more than one hospital for childbirth (OR =1.3; 95%CI: 1.2-1.5), and less likely to receive local anesthesia for an episiotomy (OR = 1.5; 95%CI: 1.1-2.1). Brown-skinned women were also more likely to have inadequate prenatal care (OR = 1.2; 95%CI: 1.1-1.4) and to lack a companion (OR = 1.4; 95%CI: 1.3-1.6) when compared with white-skinned women. We identified racial disparities in care during pregnancy and childbirth, which displayed a gradient going from worst to best care provided to black, brown and white-skinned women.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 113 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 113 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 17%
Student > Master 16 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 9%
Student > Postgraduate 9 8%
Other 19 17%
Unknown 24 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 21%
Social Sciences 16 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 30 27%