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Mechanisms driving phosphorus release during algal blooms based on hourly changes in iron and phosphorus concentrations in sediments

Overview of attention for article published in Water Research, April 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

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6 tweeters

Citations

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130 Dimensions

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88 Mendeley
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Title
Mechanisms driving phosphorus release during algal blooms based on hourly changes in iron and phosphorus concentrations in sediments
Published in
Water Research, April 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2018.01.040
Pubmed ID
Authors

Musong Chen, Shiming Ding, Xiang Chen, Qin Sun, Xianfang Fan, Juan Lin, Mingyi Ren, Liyuan Yang, Chaosheng Zhang

Abstract

Algal growth causes a drastic change in aquatic conditions over a diel cycle, which may induce sensitive feedback systems in sediments, causing P release. In this study, a microcosm experiment was performed using a suction sampler (Rhizon) to observe changes in soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and soluble Fe(II) concentrations in the top 20 mm sediment layer on a 3-h time interval, at different phases of harmful algal bloom (HAB) development. The results showed that the algal blooms prevailed up to 15 days after incubation, after which the process of bloom collapse proceeded until the 70th day. The concentrations of pore-water soluble Fe(II) and SRP increased throughout the incubation period. Compared to day 1, maximum increases of 214% in soluble Fe(II) and 387% in SRP were observed at night during the bloom and collapse periods, respectively. The diffusive fluxes of Fe and P at the sediment-water interface (SWI) generally corresponded to their changes in concentrations. Hourly fluctuation in soluble Fe(II) and SRP concentrations were observed with two distinct concentration peaks occurred at 21:00 p.m. and 06:00 a.m. (or 03:00 a.m.), respectively. These findings suggest that Fe-P coupling mechanisms are responsible for the release of P from sediments. During the collapse period, soluble Fe(II) concentrations were suppressed by the increase of labile S(-II) at night. Meanwhile, SRP concentrations were decoupled from Fe cycling with small fluctuations (<11% RSD) on an hourly timescale, and the decomposition of algae was a dominant source contributing to the release of P from sediments. These results significantly improved the understanding of processes and mechanisms behind the stimulated release of P from sediments during HABs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 19%
Student > Master 16 18%
Researcher 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Other 5 6%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 18 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 28 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 16%
Engineering 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Chemistry 3 3%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 28 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2019.
All research outputs
#7,156,171
of 14,263,181 outputs
Outputs from Water Research
#3,492
of 6,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,905
of 358,342 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Water Research
#40
of 165 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,263,181 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,970 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 358,342 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 165 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.