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Platelets kill bacteria by bridging innate and adaptive immunity via platelet factor 4 and Fcγ RIIA

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Thrombosis & Haemostasis, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
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Title
Platelets kill bacteria by bridging innate and adaptive immunity via platelet factor 4 and Fcγ RIIA
Published in
Journal of Thrombosis & Haemostasis, April 2018
DOI 10.1111/jth.13955
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. Palankar, T. P. Kohler, K. Krauel, J. Wesche, S. Hammerschmidt, A. Greinacher

Abstract

Activated platelets release the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) stored in their granules. PF4 binds to polyanions (P) on bacteria, undergoes a conformational change and exposes neoepitopes. These neoepitopes induce production of anti-PF4/P antibodies. As PF4 binds to a variety of bacteria, anti-PF4/P IgG can bind and opsonize several bacterial species. Here we investigated whether platelets are able to kill bacteria directly after recognizing anti-PF4/P IgG opsonized bacteria in the presence of PF4 via their FcγRIIA. Using platelet-bacteria suspension co-culture experiments and micropatterns with immobilized viable bacteria, in combination with pharmacological inhibitors and human anti- PF4/P IgG we analyzed the role of platelet mediated killing of bacteria. In the presence of PF4, human anti-PF4/P IgG, and platelets, E. coli killing (>50%) with colony forming units (CFU/mL) 0.71 x104 ±0.19 was observed compared to controls incubated only with anti-PF4/P IgG (CFU/mL 3.4 x104 ±0.38). Blocking of platelet FcγRIIA using mAb IV.3 (CFU/mL 2.5 x104 ±0.45), or integrin αIIbβ3 (CFU/mL 2.26 x104 ±0.31), or disruption of cytoskeletal functions (CFU/mL 2.7 x104 ±0.4) markedly reduced E. coli killing by this mechanism. Our observation of E. coli killing by platelets on micropatterned arrays is compatible with the model that platelets kill bacteria by covering them, actively concentrating them into the area under their granulomere and then releasing antimicrobial substances of platelet α-granules site directed towards bacteria. These findings collectively indicate that by bridging of innate and adaptive immune mechanism platelets and anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies cooperate in an antibacterial host response. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 44%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Professor 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 28%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Design 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2019.
All research outputs
#3,111,298
of 14,045,385 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Thrombosis & Haemostasis
#638
of 2,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,415
of 358,648 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Thrombosis & Haemostasis
#15
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,045,385 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,411 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 358,648 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.