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The importance of morphological identification of African anopheline mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) for malaria control programmes

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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75 Mendeley
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Title
The importance of morphological identification of African anopheline mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) for malaria control programmes
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2189-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erica Erlank, Lizette L. Koekemoer, Maureen Coetzee

Abstract

The correct identification of disease vectors is the first step towards implementing an effective control programme. Traditionally, for malaria control, this was based on the morphological differences observed in the adults and larvae between different mosquito species. However, the discovery of species complexes meant that genetic tools were needed to separate the sibling species and today there are standard molecular techniques that are used to identify the two major malaria vector groups of mosquitoes. On the assumption that species-diagnostic DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays are highly species-specific, experiments were conducted to investigate what would happen if non-vector species were randomly included in the molecular assays. Morphological keys for the Afrotropical Anophelinae were used to provide the a priori identifications. All mosquito specimens were then subjected to the standard PCR assays for members of the Anopheles gambiae complex and Anopheles funestus group. One hundred and fifty mosquitoes belonging to 11 morphological species were processed. Three species (Anopheles pretoriensis, Anopheles rufipes and Anopheles rhodesiensis) amplified members of the An. funestus group and four species (An. pretoriensis, An. rufipes, Anopheles listeri and Anopheles squamosus) amplified members of the An. gambiae complex. Morphological identification of mosquitoes prior to PCR assays not only saves time and money in the laboratory, but also ensures that data received by malaria vector control programmes are useful for targeting the major vectors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 23%
Researcher 12 16%
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Unspecified 7 9%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 10 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 12%
Unspecified 8 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 7%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 13 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,376,545
of 12,476,917 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#391
of 3,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,974
of 339,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#9
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,476,917 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,650 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,928 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.