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Bone mineral density at the hip and its relation to fat mass and lean mass in adolescents: the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Bone mineral density at the hip and its relation to fat mass and lean mass in adolescents: the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12891-018-1933-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Winther, Lone Jørgensen, Luai Awad Ahmed, Tore Christoffersen, Anne-Sofie Furberg, Guri Grimnes, Rolf Jorde, Ole Andreas Nilsen, Elaine Dennison, Nina Emaus

Abstract

Positive association between body weight and bone mass is well established, and the concept of body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and reduced fracture risk. BMI, that comprises both fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) may contribute to peak bone mass achievement in different ways. This study explored the influence of body composition in terms of total body LM and FM on hip aBMD-values in adolescence. In 2010/2011, 93% of the region's first-year upper-secondary school students (15-17 years old) in Tromsø, Norway attended the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures. Areal BMD at femoral neck (aBMDFN) and total hip (aBMDTH) (g/cm2), total body LM and FM (g) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Height and weight were measured, and BMI calculated. Lifestyle variables were collected by self-administered questionnaires and interviews, including questions on time spent on leisure time physical activity. Stratified analyses of covariance and regression models included 395 girls and 363 boys. Crude results were adjusted for age, height, sexual maturation, physical activity levels, vitamin D levels, calcium intake, alcohol consumption and smoking habits. Unadjusted distribution indicated higher aBMD-levels at higher LM-levels in both genders (p < 0.001), but higher aBMD at higher FM-levels were found only in girls (p < 0.018). After multiple adjustments, aBMDFN-levels in girls were associated by 0.053 g/cm2 and 0.032 g/cm2 per standard deviation (SD) change in LM and FM (p < 0.001). Corresponding values in boys were 0.072 and 0.025 (p < 0.001). The high LM groups accounted for the highest aBMD-levels, while aBMD-levels at the LM/FM-combinations indicated different patterns in girls compared to boys. The adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for low levels of aBMDFN was 6.6 (3.4,13.0) in boys, compared to 2.8 (1.6,4.9) in girls per SD lower LM. LM and FM should be regarded as strong predictors for bone mass and hence bone strength in adolescents. A gender specific difference indicated that high lean mass is of crucial importance prominently in boys. In adolescents with low lean mass, especially in girls, high fat mass may partially ameliorate the effect of deficient lean mass levels.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 18%
Sports and Recreations 4 12%
Psychology 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 11 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,299,961
of 12,419,722 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#932
of 2,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,788
of 339,549 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,419,722 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,470 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,549 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them