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Effects of Mercury Deposition and Coniferous Forests on the Mercury Contamination of Fish in the South Central United States

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of Mercury Deposition and Coniferous Forests on the Mercury Contamination of Fish in the South Central United States
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, February 2013
DOI 10.1021/es303734n
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ray W. Drenner, Matthew M. Chumchal, Christina M. Jones, Christopher M. B. Lehmann, David A. Gay, David I. Donato

Abstract

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is found in aquatic food webs and is hazardous to human and wildlife health. We examined the relationship between Hg deposition, land coverage by coniferous and deciduous forests, and average Hg concentrations in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)-equivalent fish (LMBE) in 14 ecoregions located within all or part of six states in the South Central U.S. In 11 ecoregions, the average Hg concentrations in 35.6-cm total length LMBE were above 300 ng/g, the threshold concentration of Hg recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the issuance of fish consumption advisories. Percent land coverage by coniferous forests within ecoregions had a significant linear relationship with average Hg concentrations in LMBE while percent land coverage by deciduous forests did not. Eighty percent of the variance in average Hg concentrations in LMBE between ecoregions could be accounted for by estimated Hg deposition after adjusting for the effects of coniferous forests. Here we show for the first time that fish from ecoregions with high atmospheric Hg pollution and coniferous forest coverage pose a significant hazard to human health. Our study suggests that models that use Hg deposition to predict Hg concentrations in fish could be improved by including the effects of coniferous forests on Hg deposition.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Japan 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 45 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 22 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Engineering 3 6%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,328,785
of 12,372,610 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#4,495
of 12,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,486
of 266,179 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#113
of 280 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,620 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,179 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 280 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.