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Female sexual behavior in mice is controlled by kisspeptin neurons

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

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24 Dimensions

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mendeley
109 Mendeley
Title
Female sexual behavior in mice is controlled by kisspeptin neurons
Published in
Nature Communications, January 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41467-017-02797-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vincent Hellier, Olivier Brock, Michael Candlish, Elodie Desroziers, Mari Aoki, Christian Mayer, Richard Piet, Allan Herbison, William Henry Colledge, Vincent Prévot, Ulrich Boehm, Julie Bakker

Abstract

Sexual behavior is essential for the survival of many species. In female rodents, mate preference and copulatory behavior depend on pheromones and are synchronized with ovulation to ensure reproductive success. The neural circuits driving this orchestration in the brain have, however, remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that neurons controlling ovulation in the mammalian brain are at the core of a branching neural circuit governing both mate preference and copulatory behavior. We show that male odors detected in the vomeronasal organ activate kisspeptin neurons in female mice. Classical kisspeptin/Kiss1R signaling subsequently triggers olfactory-driven mate preference. In contrast, copulatory behavior is elicited by kisspeptin neurons in a parallel circuit independent of Kiss1R involving nitric oxide signaling. Consistent with this, we find that kisspeptin neurons impinge onto nitric oxide-synthesizing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus. Our data establish kisspeptin neurons as a central regulatory hub orchestrating sexual behavior in the female mouse brain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 109 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 28%
Student > Bachelor 18 17%
Student > Master 15 14%
Researcher 13 12%
Unspecified 11 10%
Other 21 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 34 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 22%
Unspecified 16 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Other 7 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 255. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2019.
All research outputs
#50,328
of 13,763,053 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#736
of 25,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,563
of 352,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#2
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,763,053 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 25,206 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,473 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.