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A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Psychology, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
13 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
81 Mendeley
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Title
A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways
Published in
Frontiers in Psychology, March 2015
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00147
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Thomson, Alyna Turner, Sue Lauder, Margaret E. Gigler, Lesley Berk, Ajeet B. Singh, Julie A. Pasco, Michael Berk, Louisa Sylvia

Abstract

Despite evidence that exercise has been found to be effective in the treatment of depression, it is unclear whether these data can be extrapolated to bipolar disorder. Available evidence for bipolar disorder is scant, with no existing randomized controlled trials having tested the impact of exercise on depressive, manic or hypomanic symptomatology. Although exercise is often recommended in bipolar disorder, this is based on extrapolation from the unipolar literature, theory and clinical expertise and not empirical evidence. In addition, there are currently no available empirical data on program variables, with practical implications on frequency, intensity and type of exercise derived from unipolar depression studies. The aim of the current paper is to explore the relationship between exercise and bipolar disorder and potential mechanistic pathways. Given the high rate of medical co-morbidities experienced by people with bipolar disorder, it is possible that exercise is a potentially useful and important intervention with regard to general health benefits; however, further research is required to elucidate the impact of exercise on mood symptomology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Unknown 79 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 17%
Student > Master 12 15%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Unspecified 7 9%
Other 32 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 30%
Psychology 18 22%
Unspecified 10 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 10%
Neuroscience 6 7%
Other 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2018.
All research outputs
#596,510
of 12,834,493 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Psychology
#1,060
of 12,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,185
of 275,250 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Psychology
#48
of 414 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,834,493 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,537 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,250 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 414 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.