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The interaction of intraspecific competition and habitat on individual diet specialization: a near range-wide examination of sea otters

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, February 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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45 Dimensions

Readers on

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150 Mendeley
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Title
The interaction of intraspecific competition and habitat on individual diet specialization: a near range-wide examination of sea otters
Published in
Oecologia, February 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00442-015-3223-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seth D. Newsome, M. Tim Tinker, Verena A. Gill, Zachary N. Hoyt, Angela Doroff, Linda Nichol, James L. Bodkin

Abstract

The quantification of individuality is a common research theme in the fields of population, community, and evolutionary ecology. The potential for individuality to arise is likely context-dependent, and the influence of habitat characteristics on its prevalence has received less attention than intraspecific competition. We examined individual diet specialization in 16 sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations from southern California to the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. Because population histories, relative densities, and habitat characteristics vary widely among sites, we could examine the effects of intraspecific competition and habitat on the prevalence of individual diet specialization. Using observed diet data, we classified half of our sites as rocky substrate habitats and the other half containing a mixture of rocky and unconsolidated (soft) sediment substrates. We used stable isotope data to quantify population- and individual-level diet variation. Among rocky substrate sites, the slope [±standard error (SE)] of the positive significant relationship between the within-individual component (WIC) and total isotopic niche width (TINW) was shallow (0.23 ± 0.07) and negatively correlated with sea otter density. In contrast, the slope of the positive WIC/TINW relationship for populations inhabiting mixed substrate habitats was much higher (0.53 ± 0.14), suggesting a low degree of individuality, irrespective of intraspecific competition. Our results show that the potential for individuality to occur as a result of increasing intraspecific competition is context-dependent and that habitat characteristics, which ultimately influence prey diversity, relative abundance, and the range of skillsets required for efficient prey procurement, are important in determining when and where individual diet specialization occurs in nature.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 5%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 139 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 42 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 25%
Researcher 23 15%
Student > Bachelor 16 11%
Unspecified 7 5%
Other 25 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 110 73%
Environmental Science 22 15%
Unspecified 12 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 1%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 3 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2015.
All research outputs
#7,012,475
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#1,934
of 3,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,908
of 275,288 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#25
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,288 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.