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Role and Significance of Quantitative Urine Cultures in Diagnosis of Melioidosis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical Microbiology, May 2005
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Role and Significance of Quantitative Urine Cultures in Diagnosis of Melioidosis
Published in
Journal of Clinical Microbiology, May 2005
DOI 10.1128/jcm.43.5.2274-2276.2005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Direk Limmathurotsakul, Vanaporn Wuthiekanun, Wirongrong Chierakul, Allen C. Cheng, Bina Maharjan, Wipada Chaowagul, Nicholas J. White, Nicholas P. J. Day, Sharon J. Peacock

Abstract

Melioidosis is associated with significant mortality in countries in which it is endemic. Previous studies have demonstrated that quantitative Burkholderia pseudomallei counts in blood are predictive of mortality. Here we examine the relationship between outcomes and quantitative B. pseudomallei counts in urine. A total of 755 patients presenting to Sappasithiprasong Hospital, Ubon Ratchathani, northeast Thailand (in the northeast part of the country), with melioidosis between July 1993 and October 2003 had quantitative urine cultures performed within 72 h of admission. Urine culture results were divided into the following groups: (i) no growth of B. pseudomallei from a neat sample or pellet, (ii) positive result from a centrifuged pellet only (< 10(3) CFU/ml), (iii) detection of between 10(3) CFU/ml and 10(5) CFU/ml from a neat sample, or (iv) detection of > or = 10(5) CFU/ml from a neat sample. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 45%. Patients with negative urine cultures had the lowest death rate (39%). Mortality rates rose with increasing B. pseudomallei counts in urine, from 58% for those with positive spun pellets only to 61% for those with between 10(3) CFU/ml and 10(5) CFU/ml and 71% for those with > or = 10(5) CFU/ml. This was independent of age, presence of bacteremia, known risk factors for melioidosis such as diabetes, and the prior administration of antibiotics. The presence of B. pseudomallei in urine during systemic infection is associated with a poor prognosis.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Professor 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 8 29%
Unknown 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Decision Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2009.
All research outputs
#5,806,575
of 17,833,098 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical Microbiology
#4,746
of 11,696 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,013
of 298,007 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical Microbiology
#42
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,833,098 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,696 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,007 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.