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Entomopathogenic fungi and their potential for the management of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Americas

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, March 2018
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Title
Entomopathogenic fungi and their potential for the management of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Americas
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, March 2018
DOI 10.1590/0074-02760170369
Pubmed ID
Authors

Harry C Evans, Simon L Elliot, Robert W Barreto

Abstract

Classical biological control has been used extensively for the management of exotic weeds and agricultural pests, but never for alien insect vectors of medical importance. This simple but elegant control strategy involves the introduction of coevolved natural enemies from the centre of origin of the target alien species. Aedes aegypti - the primary vector of the dengue, yellow fever and Zika flaviviruses - is just such an invasive alien in the Americas where it arrived accidentally from its West African home during the slave trade. Here, we introduce the concept of exploiting entomopathogenic fungi from Africa for the classical biological control of Ae. aegypti in the Americas. Fungal pathogens attacking arthropods are ubiquitous in tropical forests and are important components in the natural balance of arthropod populations. They can produce a range of specialised spore forms, as well as inducing a variety of bizarre behaviours in their hosts, in order to maximise infection. The fungal groups recorded as specialised pathogens of mosquito hosts worldwide are described and discussed. We opine that similar fungal pathogens will be found attacking and manipulating Ae. aegypti in African forests and that these could be employed for an economic, environmentally-safe and long-term solution to the flavivirus pandemics in the Americas.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 127 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 22%
Student > Bachelor 21 17%
Researcher 16 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 6 5%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 29 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 5%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 30 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2018.
All research outputs
#19,951,180
of 25,382,440 outputs
Outputs from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#1,137
of 1,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#253,777
of 344,853 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#13
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,382,440 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,502 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,853 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.