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Pulmonary arterial hypertension reduces energy efficiency of right, but not left, rat ventricular trabeculae

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiology, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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6 Mendeley
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Title
Pulmonary arterial hypertension reduces energy efficiency of right, but not left, rat ventricular trabeculae
Published in
Journal of Physiology, February 2018
DOI 10.1113/jp275578
Pubmed ID
Authors

Toan Pham, Linley Nisbet, Andrew Taberner, Denis Loiselle, June-Chiew Han

Abstract

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) greatly increases the afterload on the right ventricle (RV), triggering RV hypertrophy, which progressively leads to RV failure. In contrast, the disease reduces the passive filling pressure of the left ventricle (LV), resulting in LV atrophy. We investigated whether these distinct structural and functional consequences to the ventricles affect their respective energy efficiencies. We studied trabeculae isolated from both ventricles of Wistar rats with monocrotaline-induced PAH and their respective Control groups. Trabeculae were mounted in a calorimeter at 37°C. While contracting at 5 Hz, they were subjected to stress-length work-loops over a wide range of afterloads. They were subsequently required to undergo a series of isometric contractions at various muscle lengths. In both protocols, stress production, length change, and suprabasal heat output were simultaneously measured. We found that RV trabeculae from PAH rats generated higher activation heat, but developed normal active stress. Their peak external work output was lower due to reduced extent and velocity of shortening. Despite lower peak work output, suprabasal enthalpy was unaffected, thereby rendering suprabasal efficiency lower. Crossbridge efficiency, however, was unaffected. In contrast, LV trabeculae from PAH rats maintained normal mechano-energetic performance. Pulmonary arterial hypertension reduces the suprabasal energy efficiency of hypertrophied right-ventricular tissues, as a consequence of the increased energy cost for Ca2+ cycling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 33%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 17%
Unspecified 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 33%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 17%
Environmental Science 1 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 17%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2018.
All research outputs
#3,713,509
of 12,793,889 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiology
#2,017
of 6,533 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,920
of 346,582 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiology
#47
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,793,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,533 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,582 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.