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Rat strain differences in peritoneal immune cell response to selected gut microbiota: A crossroad between tolerance and autoimmunity?

Overview of attention for article published in Life Sciences, February 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

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Title
Rat strain differences in peritoneal immune cell response to selected gut microbiota: A crossroad between tolerance and autoimmunity?
Published in
Life Sciences, February 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.lfs.2018.02.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Veljko Blagojević, Vesna Kovačević-Jovanović, Ivana Ćuruvija, Raisa Petrović, Ivana Vujnović, Vesna Vujić, Stanislava Stanojević

Abstract

Some gut commensals can be protective, whereas others are implicated as necessary for development of inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. Peritoneal immune cells may play an important role in promoting autoimmunity in response to gut microbiota. This study investigated the phenotype and the function of peritoneal immune cells in the autoimmunity-resistant Albino Oxford (AO), and the autoimmunity-prone Dark Agouti (DA) rat strains upon stimulation with their own colonic E. coli or Enterococcus. Rats were intraperitoneally injected with their own E. coli or Enterococcus. Peritoneal cells isolated two days later were tested for nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine production, and for arginase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The phenotype of cells was determined using flow cytometry. While the Enterococcus injection did not affect the composition of peritoneal cells in AO rats, the E. coli treatment increased the percentages of activated CD11bintHIS48hi neutrophils, and decreased the proportion of resident (CD11bhiHIS48int/low, CD163 + CD86+) and anti-inflammatory CD68 + CD206+ macrophages. E. coli increased the production of NO and urea, but preserved their ratio in cells from AO rats. Conversely, both E. coli and Enterococcus diminished the proportion of resident and anti-inflammatory macrophages, increased the proportion of activated neutrophils, and induced inflammatory polarization of peritoneal cells in DA rats. However, injection of E. coli maintained the ratio of typical CD11bintHIS48int neutrophils in DA rats, which correlated with the sustained MPO activity. The rat strain differences in peritoneal cell response to own commensal microbiota may contribute to differential susceptibility to inflammatory/autoimmune diseases.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 33%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Other 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Student > Master 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 7 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 6 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Chemistry 2 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 7 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2018.
All research outputs
#17,292,294
of 25,382,440 outputs
Outputs from Life Sciences
#5,120
of 7,632 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#283,449
of 447,797 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Life Sciences
#24
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,382,440 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,632 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 447,797 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.