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Sudden spleen rupture in a Plasmodium vivax-infected patient undergoing malaria treatment

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2018
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1 tweeter

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Title
Sudden spleen rupture in a Plasmodium vivax-infected patient undergoing malaria treatment
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2228-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aleix Elizalde-Torrent, Fernando Val, Ingrid Cardoso C. Azevedo, Wuelton M. Monteiro, Luiz C. L. Ferreira, Carmen Fernández-Becerra, Hernando A. del Portillo, Marcus V. G. Lacerda

Abstract

Splenomegaly is one of the most common features of malaria. However, spontaneous splenic rupture, although unusual, represents a severe complication often leading to death. It is mostly seen in acute infection and primary attack, and it is most commonly associated with Plasmodium vivax. Here, a case of spontaneous splenic rupture diagnosed with a portable ultrasound apparatus shortly after starting treatment and with recurrent parasitaemia after splenectomy, is reported. In November 2015, a 45-year-old Brazilian man presented to the hospital in Manaus with fever, headache and myalgia. He was diagnosed with P. vivax malaria and, after a normal G6PD test, he started treatment with chloroquine and primaquine and was discharged. Two days later, he went back to the hospital with abdominal pain, dyspnea, dry cough, pallor, oliguria and fever. Using a portable ultrasound, he was diagnosed of rupture of the spleen, which was removed by emergency surgery. After this episode, he suffered two more malaria episodes with high parasitaemia at approximately 2-month intervals. DNA from different portions of the spleen was extracted and a qualitative PCR was performed to detect P. vivax. The splenic rupture suffered by this patient occurred 2 days after starting the treatment. Having a portable ultrasound apparatus may have saved the patient's life, as it revealed a haemorrhage needing an urgent surgery. Parasites were detected by PCR in the extracted spleen. This patient suffered two more vivax malaria diagnosed episodes in spite of receiving and completing treatment with chloroquine and primaquine for each clinical attack. Splenic rupture during acute malaria is uncommon, but it is likely underdiagnosed and underreported, because the lack of means and equipment hinders diagnostic confirmation, especially in endemic areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Librarian 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Engineering 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 8 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2018.
All research outputs
#10,007,834
of 12,504,607 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,158
of 3,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#250,166
of 345,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,504,607 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,653 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,233 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
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