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A smartphone dongle for diagnosis of infectious diseases at the point of care.

Overview of attention for article published in Science Translational Medicine, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 2,744)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
82 news outlets
blogs
14 blogs
twitter
365 tweeters
weibo
2 weibo users
facebook
33 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
272 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
A smartphone dongle for diagnosis of infectious diseases at the point of care.
Published in
Science Translational Medicine, February 2015
DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa0056
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tassaneewan Laksanasopin, Tiffany W. Guo, Samiksha Nayak, Archana A. Sridhara, Shi Xie, Owolabi O. Olowookere, Paolo Cadinu, Fanxing Meng, Natalie H. Chee, Jiyoon Kim, Curtis D. Chin, Elisaphane Munyazesa, Placidie Mugwaneza, Alex J. Rai, Veronicah Mugisha, Arnold R. Castro, David Steinmiller, Vincent Linder, Jessica E. Justman, Sabin Nsanzimana, Samuel K. Sia

Abstract

This work demonstrates that a full laboratory-quality immunoassay can be run on a smartphone accessory. This low-cost dongle replicates all mechanical, optical, and electronic functions of a laboratory-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) without requiring any stored energy; all necessary power is drawn from a smartphone. Rwandan health care workers used the dongle to test whole blood obtained via fingerprick from 96 patients enrolling into care at prevention of mother-to-child transmission clinics or voluntary counseling and testing centers. The dongle performed a triplexed immunoassay not currently available in a single test format: HIV antibody, treponemal-specific antibody for syphilis, and nontreponemal antibody for active syphilis infection. In a blinded experiment, health care workers obtained diagnostic results in 15 min from our triplex test that rivaled the gold standard of laboratory-based HIV ELISA and rapid plasma reagin (a screening test for syphilis), with sensitivity of 92 to 100% and specificity of 79 to 100%, consistent with needs of current clinical algorithms. Patient preference for the dongle was 97% compared to laboratory-based tests, with most pointing to the convenience of obtaining quick results with a single fingerprick. This work suggests that coupling microfluidics with recent advances in consumer electronics can make certain laboratory-based diagnostics accessible to almost any population with access to smartphones.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 365 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 272 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 5%
Japan 4 1%
Germany 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Korea, Republic of 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Other 5 2%
Unknown 236 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 82 30%
Researcher 68 25%
Student > Master 41 15%
Student > Bachelor 21 8%
Other 13 5%
Other 47 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 89 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 62 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 12%
Chemistry 24 9%
Social Sciences 11 4%
Other 54 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1004. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2016.
All research outputs
#1,611
of 7,931,438 outputs
Outputs from Science Translational Medicine
#12
of 2,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68
of 237,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Translational Medicine
#2
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,931,438 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,744 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.