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Adjuvant endocrine therapy after breast cancer: a qualitative study of factors associated with adherence

Overview of attention for article published in Patient preference and adherence, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
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Title
Adjuvant endocrine therapy after breast cancer: a qualitative study of factors associated with adherence
Published in
Patient preference and adherence, February 2018
DOI 10.2147/ppa.s145784
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jo Brett, Mary Boulton, Deborah Fenlon, Nicholas J Hulbert-Williams, Fiona M Walter, Peter Donnelly, Bernadette Lavery, Adrienne Morgan, Carolyn Morris, Eila Watson

Abstract

Despite evidence of the efficacy of adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) in reducing the risk of recurrence and mortality after treatment for primary breast cancer, adherence to AET is suboptimal. This study aimed to explore factors that influence adherence and nonadherence to AET following breast cancer to inform the development of supportive interventions. Interviews were conducted with 32 women who had been prescribed AET, 2-4 years following their diagnosis of breast cancer. Both adherers (n=19) and nonadherers (n=13) were recruited. The analysis was conducted using the Framework approach. Factors associated with adherence were as follows: managing side effects including information and advice on side effects and taking control of side effects, supportive relationships, and personal influences. Factors associated with nonadherence were as follows: burden of side effects, feeling unsupported, concerns about long-term AET use, regaining normality, including valuing the quality of life over length of life, and risk perception. Provision of timely information to prepare women for the potential side effects of AET and education on medication management strategies are needed, including provision of timely and accurate information on the efficacy of AET in reducing breast cancer recurrence and on potential side effects and ways to manage these should they arise. Trust in the doctor-patient relationship and clear patient pathways for bothersome side effects and concerns with AET are important. Training and education on AET for GPs should be considered alongside novel care pathways such as primary care nurse cancer care review and community pharmacist follow-up.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 24%
Unspecified 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Other 6 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 8 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 29%
Unspecified 3 14%
Psychology 3 14%
Engineering 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,196,212
of 12,538,691 outputs
Outputs from Patient preference and adherence
#515
of 1,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,134
of 389,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Patient preference and adherence
#23
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,538,691 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,058 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 389,450 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.