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Points-based physical activity: a novel approach to facilitate changes in body composition in inactive women with overweight and obesity

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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41 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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99 Mendeley
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Title
Points-based physical activity: a novel approach to facilitate changes in body composition in inactive women with overweight and obesity
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5125-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adrian Holliday, Alice Burgin, Elyzabeth Vargas Fernandez, Sally A. M. Fenton, Frank Thielecke, Andrew K. Blannin

Abstract

Physical activity (PA) interventions for the promotion of weight-management may benefit from increased choice and flexibility to overcome commonly-perceived barriers to PA. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a novel "points-based" approach to PA on body composition in inactive women, who are overweight or obese. Seventy-six overweight or obese, inactive women were randomly allocated to one of three conditions: 'Points-based' PA (PBPA; 30 "PA points"•week- 1), Structured exercise (StructEx; 150 min moderate-intensity exercise•week- 1) or control (CONT; continue habitual inactive lifestyle) for a 24-week intervention. PA points for activities were adapted from MET values, and 30 points was equivalent to 150 min of brisk walking. Measures of body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and anthropometry were obtained at weeks 0, 4, 12 and 24. Self-report activities were recorded weekly, with objective measures of PA (tri-axial accelerometry) and self-report measures of food intake obtained at weeks 0 and 24. Fifty-eight women completed the study and provided data for primary outcomes. Of these, n = 41 and n = 19 provided data for food intake and objectively assessed PA. Mixed-design ANOVAs demonstrated that those in PBPA achieved a significant weight-loss at 24 weeks of - 3.3 ± 5.9 kg (- 3.4 ± 7.1%, p = 0.004). Waist circumference was reduced in PBPA at 24 weeks (- 2.8 ± 4.6 cm), compared with CONT (+ 2.1 ± 6.6 cm, p = 0.024). There was a trend for greater reductions in fat mass for those in PBPA vs. CONT (- 2.3 ± 4.6 kg vs. + 0.1 ± 2.0 kg, p = 0.075). Android fat was reduced in PBPA at both 12 weeks (- 6.1 ± 12.6%, p = 0.005) and 24 weeks (- 10.1 ± 18.4%, p = 0.005), while there was a trend for greater reductions in visceral adipose tissue in PBPA (- 5.8 ± 26.0%) vs. CONT at 24 weeks (+ 7.8 ± 18.3%, p = 0.053). Body composition, body weight and waist circumference were unchanged in StructEx. There were trends for increases in light-activity and reductions in sedentary time in PBPA. There was a trend for a reduction in daily energy intake of - 445 ± 564 kcal (p = 0.074), and a significant reduction in daily fat intake (p = 0.042) in PBPA. A "points-based" approach to physical activity appears to be an effective strategy for inducing modest reductions in body weight and body fat in inactive women with overweight and obesity. NCT02020239 . Registered 12th December 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 99 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Unspecified 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 10%
Researcher 9 9%
Other 20 20%
Unknown 23 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 19 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 17%
Unspecified 12 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 10%
Psychology 4 4%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 26 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2018.
All research outputs
#719,903
of 15,226,802 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#762
of 10,517 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,005
of 276,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,226,802 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,517 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,162 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them