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Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in postmenopausal women and relationship with pain and HRT

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Oral Research, January 2016
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Title
Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in postmenopausal women and relationship with pain and HRT
Published in
Brazilian Oral Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1590/1807-3107bor-2016.vol30.0100
Pubmed ID
Authors

LORA, Victor Ricardo Manuel Muñoz, CANALES, Giancarlo De la Torre, GONÇALVES, Leticia Machado, MELOTO, Carolina Beraldo, BARBOSA, Celia Marisa Rizzatti

Abstract

The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is higher in females, reaching their high peak during reproductive years, probably because of the action of some female hormones, which alter pain threshold. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of TMD in postmenopausal women and its relationship with pain and hormone replacement therapy (HRT). In total, 284 patients were evaluated and classified using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Pain was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and patients were also asked about the use of HRT. All data was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square test. In total, 155 subjects did not have TMD and 129 had TMD; TMD group patients were classified according to RDC/TMD axis I classification as follows: muscle disorder group (1.6%), disk displacement group (72.87%), and arthralgia, osteoarthritis, and osteoarthrosis group (37.98%). Pain was registered in 35 patients who belonged to the TMD group, while 48 patients reported the use of HRT. There was a similar percentage of TMD and non TMD patients; moreover, the use of exogenous hormones was no associated with TMD, suggesting that there is no influence on the pain threshold.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 71 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 15 20%
Student > Master 13 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 5%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 20 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 47%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Psychology 2 3%
Social Sciences 1 1%
Sports and Recreations 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 25 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2018.
All research outputs
#11,120,637
of 12,504,607 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Oral Research
#117
of 142 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,194
of 270,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Oral Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,504,607 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 142 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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