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Lessons learned from research and surveillance directed at highly pathogenic influenza A viruses in wild birds inhabiting North America

Overview of attention for article published in Virology, May 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

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4 tweeters

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14 Dimensions

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Lessons learned from research and surveillance directed at highly pathogenic influenza A viruses in wild birds inhabiting North America
Published in
Virology, May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.virol.2018.02.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew M. Ramey, Thomas J. DeLiberto, Yohannes Berhane, David E. Swayne, David E. Stallknecht

Abstract

Following detections of highly pathogenic (HP) influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild birds inhabiting East Asia after the turn of the millennium, the intensity of sampling of wild birds for IAVs increased throughout much of North America. The objectives for many research and surveillance efforts were directed towards detecting Eurasian origin HP IAVs and understanding the potential of such viruses to be maintained and dispersed by wild birds. In this review, we highlight five important lessons learned from research and surveillance directed at HP IAVs in wild birds inhabiting North America: (1) Wild birds may disperse IAVs between North America and adjacent regions via migration, (2) HP IAVs can be introduced to wild birds in North America, (3) HP IAVs may cross the wild bird-poultry interface in North America, (4) The probability of encountering and detecting a specific virus may be low, and (5) Population immunity of wild birds may influence HP IAV outbreaks in North America. We review empirical support derived from research and surveillance efforts for each lesson learned and, furthermore, identify implications for future surveillance efforts, biosecurity, and population health. We conclude our review by identifying five additional areas in which we think future mechanistic research relative to IAVs in wild birds in North America are likely to lead to other important lessons learned in the years ahead.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 34%
Student > Master 6 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 29%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2018.
All research outputs
#9,528,044
of 15,555,267 outputs
Outputs from Virology
#7,143
of 8,227 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,216
of 277,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology
#20
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,555,267 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,227 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,021 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.