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Assessment of soil metal concentrations in residential and community vegetable gardens in Melbourne, Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Chemosphere, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Assessment of soil metal concentrations in residential and community vegetable gardens in Melbourne, Australia
Published in
Chemosphere, May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.02.044
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark A.S. Laidlaw, Dileepa H. Alankarage, Suzie M. Reichman, Mark Patrick Taylor, Andrew S. Ball

Abstract

Gardening and urban food production is an increasingly popular activity, which can improve physical and mental health and provide low cost nutritious food. However, the legacy of contamination from industrial and diffuse sources may have rendered surface soils in some urban gardens to have metals value in excess of recommended guidelines for agricultural production. The objective of this study was to establish the presence and spatial extent of soil metal contamination in Melbourne's residential and inner city community gardens. A secondary objective was to assess whether soil lead (Pb) concentrations in residential vegetable gardens were associated with the age of the home or the presence or absence of paint. The results indicate that most samples in residential and community gardens were generally below the Australian residential guidelines for all tested metals except Pb. Mean soil Pb concentrations exceeded the Australian HIL-A residential guideline of 300 mg/kg in 8% of 13 community garden beds and 21% of the 136 residential vegetable gardens assessed. Mean and median soil Pb concentrations for residential vegetable gardens was 204 mg/kg and 104 mg/kg (range <4-3341 mg/kg), respectively. Mean and median soil Pb concentration for community vegetable garden beds was 102 mg/kg and 38 mg/kg (range = 17-578 mg/kg), respectively. Soil Pb concentrations were higher in homes with painted exteriors (p = 0.004); generally increased with age of the home (p = 0.000); and were higher beneath the household dripline than in vegetable garden beds (p = 0.040). In certain circumstances, the data indicates that elevated soil Pb concentrations could present a potential health hazard in a portion of inner-city residential vegetable gardens in Melbourne.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 20%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 2 5%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 8 20%
Social Sciences 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,199,562
of 14,125,611 outputs
Outputs from Chemosphere
#3,818
of 6,759 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,111
of 273,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chemosphere
#43
of 185 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,125,611 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,759 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 185 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.