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Sleep to Lower Elevated Blood Pressure: A Randomized Controlled Trial (SLEPT)

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Hypertension (Science Direct), January 2017
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Title
Sleep to Lower Elevated Blood Pressure: A Randomized Controlled Trial (SLEPT)
Published in
American Journal of Hypertension (Science Direct), January 2017
DOI 10.1093/ajh/hpw132
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emer R. McGrath, Colin A. Espie, Alice Power, Andrew W. Murphy, John Newell, Caroline Kelly, Niamh Duffy, Patricia Gunning, Irene Gibson, Sophie Bostock, Martin J. O’Donnell

Abstract

Impaired sleep quality is common and associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), thought to be mediated through adverse effects on established vascular risk factors, particularly hypertension. We determined if a web-delivered sleep intervention (sleep-hygiene education, stimulus control, and cognitive behavioral therapy) reduces blood pressure compared to vascular risk factor education (standard care) alone. Phase II randomized, blinded, controlled trial of 134 participants without CVD with mild sleep impairment and blood pressure 130-160/<110 mm Hg. The primary outcome was the difference in the mean change in 24-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP) over 8 weeks between intervention and control groups. Secondary outcomes included measures of sleep quality and psychosocial health, namely Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Participants in the sleep intervention group showed significantly greater improvements in sleep quality, including ISI [difference in mean improvement 2.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-4.4], PSQI (1.1; 95% CI, 0.1-2.2), sleep condition indicator (0.8; 95% CI, 0.2-1.4), and psychosocial health, including BDI (2.0; 95% CI, 0.3-3.7) and BAI (1.4; 95% CI, 0.02-2.8). The mean improvement in 24-hour ambulatory SBP did not differ between the sleep intervention (0.9 mm Hg) and control (0.8 mm Hg) arms, (difference in mean improvement 0.1; 95% CI, -3.4 to 3.2). A simple, low-cost, web-delivered sleep intervention is feasible and significantly improves sleep quality and measures of psychosocial health in individuals with mild sleep impairment but does not result in short-term improvements in blood pressure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 140 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 20%
Student > Master 17 12%
Researcher 14 10%
Other 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 10%
Other 37 26%
Unknown 16 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 40 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 12%
Neuroscience 7 5%
Unspecified 6 4%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 28 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2018.
All research outputs
#10,028,279
of 12,532,910 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Hypertension (Science Direct)
#1,017
of 1,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#202,072
of 271,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Hypertension (Science Direct)
#16
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,532,910 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,284 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,106 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.