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Continued cannabis use at one year follow up is associated with elevated mood and lower global functioning in bipolar I disorder

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Continued cannabis use at one year follow up is associated with elevated mood and lower global functioning in bipolar I disorder
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0389-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Levi Roestad Kvitland, Ingrid Melle, Sofie Ragnhild Aminoff, Christine Demmo, Trine Vik Lagerberg, Ole Andreas Andreassen, Petter Andreas Ringen

Abstract

BackgroundThere is limited knowledge about how environmental factors affect the course of bipolar disorder (BD). Cannabis has been proposed as a potential risk factor for poorer course of illness, but the role of cannabis use has not been studied in a first treatment BD I sample.MethodsThe present study examines the associations between course of illness in first treatment BD I and continued cannabis use, from baseline to one year follow up. Patients (N¿=¿62) with first treatment DSM-IV BD I were included as part of the Thematically Organized Psychosis study (TOP), and completed interviews and self-report questionnaires at both baseline and follow up. Cannabis use within the last six months at baseline and use between baseline and follow up (¿continued use¿) was recorded.ResultsAfter controlling for confounders, continued cannabis use was significantly associated with elevated mood (YMRS) and inferior global functioning (GAF-F) at follow up. Elevated mood mediated the effect of cannabis use on global functioning.ConclusionsThese results suggest that cannabis use has clinical implications for the early course of BD by increasing mood level. More focus on reducing cannabis use in clinical settings seems to be useful for improving outcome in early phase of the disorder.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 8%
Colombia 1 2%
Unknown 48 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 15%
Researcher 7 13%
Other 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Other 13 25%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 32%
Psychology 10 19%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2015.
All research outputs
#4,046,794
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,507
of 3,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,255
of 282,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,335 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.