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Three-dimensional analysis of synapses in the transentorhinal cortex of Alzheimer’s disease patients

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Three-dimensional analysis of synapses in the transentorhinal cortex of Alzheimer’s disease patients
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40478-018-0520-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Domínguez-Álvaro, M. Montero-Crespo, L. Blazquez-Llorca, R. Insausti, J. DeFelipe, L. Alonso-Nanclares

Abstract

Synaptic dysfunction or loss in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to be a major structural correlate of cognitive dysfunction. Early loss of episodic memory, which occurs at the early stage of AD, is closely associated with the progressive degeneration of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures of which the transentorhinal cortex (TEC) is the first affected area. However, no ultrastructural studies have been performed in this region in human brain samples from AD patients. In the present study, we have performed a detailed three-dimensional (3D) ultrastructural analysis using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) to investigate possible synaptic alterations in the TEC of patients with AD. Surprisingly, the analysis of the density, morphological features and spatial distribution of synapses in the neuropil showed no significant differences between AD and control samples. However, light microscopy studies showed that cortical thickness of the TEC was severely reduced in AD samples, but there were no changes in the volume occupied by neuronal and glial cell bodies, blood vessels, and neuropil. Thus, the present results indicate that there is a dramatic loss of absolute number of synapses, while the morphology of synaptic junctions and synaptic spatial distribution are maintained. How these changes affect cognitive impairment in AD remains to be elucidated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Student > Master 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 13 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 14 27%
Psychology 6 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 8%
Chemistry 3 6%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 14 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2020.
All research outputs
#5,131,788
of 16,287,402 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#645
of 981 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,924
of 280,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,287,402 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 981 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them