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A parasitism–mutualism–predation model consisting of crows, cuckoos and cats with stage-structure and maturation delays on crows and cuckoos

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Theoretical Biology, June 2018
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
A parasitism–mutualism–predation model consisting of crows, cuckoos and cats with stage-structure and maturation delays on crows and cuckoos
Published in
Journal of Theoretical Biology, June 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jtbi.2018.02.028
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yantao Luo, Long Zhang, Zhidong Teng, Donald L. DeAngelis

Abstract

In this paper, a parasitism-mutualism-predation model is proposed to investigate the dynamics of multi-interactions among cuckoos, crows and cats with stage-structure and maturation time delays on cuckoos and crows. The crows permit the cuckoos to parasitize their nestlings (eggs) on the crow chicks (eggs). In return, the cuckoo nestlings produce a malodorous cloacal secretion to protect the crow chicks from predation by the cats, which is apparently beneficial to both the crow and cuckoo population. The multi-interactions, i.e., parasitism and mutualism between the cuckoos (nestlings) and crows (chicks), predation between the cats and crow chicks are modeled both by Holling-type II and Beddington-DeAngelis-type functional responses. The existence of positive equilibria of three subsystems of the model are discussed. The criteria for the global stability of the trivial equilibrium are established by the Krein-Rutman Theorem and other analysis methods. Moreover, the threshold dynamics for the coexistence and weak persistence of the model are obtained, and we show, both analytically and numerically, that the stabilities of the interior equilibria may change with the increasing maturation time delays. We find there exists an evident difference in the dynamical properties of the parasitism-mutualism-predation model based on whether or not we consider the effects of stage-structure and maturation time delays on cuckoos and crows. Inclusion of stage structure results in many varied dynamical complexities which are difficult to encompass without this inclusion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Other 2 13%
Professor 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 40%
Mathematics 4 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Unknown 3 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2019.
All research outputs
#9,528,269
of 15,555,501 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Theoretical Biology
#1,933
of 3,331 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#156,372
of 278,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Theoretical Biology
#25
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,555,501 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,331 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,398 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.