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The left frontal cortex supports reserve in aging by enhancing functional network efficiency

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
The left frontal cortex supports reserve in aging by enhancing functional network efficiency
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13195-018-0358-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicolai Franzmeier, Julia Hartmann, Alexander N. W. Taylor, Miguel Á. Araque-Caballero, Lee Simon-Vermot, Lana Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Katharina Bürger, Cihan Catak, Daniel Janowitz, Claudia Müller, Birgit Ertl-Wagner, Robert Stahl, Martin Dichgans, Marco Duering, Michael Ewers

Abstract

Recent evidence derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggests that functional hubs (i.e., highly connected brain regions) are important for mental health. We found recently that global connectivity of a hub in the left frontal cortex (LFC connectivity) is associated with relatively preserved memory abilities and higher levels of protective factors (education, IQ) in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. These results suggest that LFC connectivity supports reserve capacity, alleviating memory decline. An open question, however, is why LFC connectivity is beneficial and supports memory function in the face of neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that higher LFC connectivity is associated with enhanced efficiency in connected major networks involved in episodic memory. We further hypothesized that higher LFC-related network efficiency predicts higher memory abilities. We assessed fMRI during a face-name association learning task performed by 26 healthy, cognitively normal elderly participants. Using beta-series correlation analysis, we computed task-related LFC connectivity to key memory networks, including the default mode network (DMN) and dorsal attention network (DAN). Network efficiency within the DMN and DAN was estimated by the graph theoretical small-worldness statistic. We applied linear regression analyses to test the association between LFC connectivity with the DMN/DAN and small-worldness of these networks. Mediation analysis was applied to test LFC connectivity to the DMN and DAN as a mediator of the association between education and higher DMN and DAN small-worldness. Last, we tested network small-worldness as a predictor of memory performance. We found that higher LFC connectivity to the DMN and DAN during successful memory encoding and recognition was associated with higher small-worldness of those networks. Higher task-related LFC connectivity mediated the association between education and higher small-worldness in the DMN and DAN. Further, higher small-worldness of these networks predicted better performance in the memory task. The present results suggest that higher education-related LFC connectivity to key memory networks during a memory task is associated with higher network efficiency and thus enhanced reserve of memory abilities in aging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 8 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 20 30%
Psychology 15 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 15 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,723,865
of 16,109,844 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#343
of 781 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,828
of 281,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,109,844 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 781 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,276 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them