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Predictors and pattern of weaning and long-term outcome of patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation at an acute intensive care unit in North India

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva, January 2017
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Title
Predictors and pattern of weaning and long-term outcome of patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation at an acute intensive care unit in North India
Published in
Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva, January 2017
DOI 10.5935/0103-507x.20170005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Syed Nabeel Muzaffar, Mohan Gurjar, Arvind K. Baronia, Afzal Azim, Prabhakar Mishra, Banani Poddar, Ratender K. Singh

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the clinical characteristics, weaning pattern, and outcome of patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation in acute intensive care unit settings in a resource-limited country. This was a prospective single-center observational study in India, where all adult patients requiring prolonged ventilation were followed for weaning duration and pattern and for survival at both intensive care unit discharge and at 12 months. The definition of prolonged mechanical ventilation used was that of the National Association for Medical Direction of Respiratory Care. During the one-year period, 49 patients with a mean age of 49.7 years had prolonged ventilation; 63% were male, and 84% had a medical illness. The median APACHE II and SOFA scores on admission were 17 and 9, respectively. The median number of ventilation days was 37. The most common reason for starting ventilation was respiratory failure secondary to sepsis (67%). Weaning was initiated in 39 (79.5%) patients, with success in 34 (87%). The median weaning duration was 14 (9.5 - 19) days, and the median length of intensive care unit stay was 39 (32 - 58.5) days. Duration of vasopressor support and need for hemodialysis were significant independent predictors of unsuccessful ventilator liberation. At the 12-month follow-up, 65% had survived. In acute intensive care units, more than one-fourth of patients with invasive ventilation required prolonged ventilation. Successful weaning was achieved in two-thirds of patients, and most survived at the 12-month follow-up.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 27%
Student > Postgraduate 4 13%
Other 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 8 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 30%
Unspecified 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Unknown 9 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2018.
All research outputs
#11,225,130
of 12,612,351 outputs
Outputs from Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva
#149
of 196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#237,220
of 273,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,612,351 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 196 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,646 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them