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Human Bacteroides and total coliforms as indicators of recent combined sewer overflows and rain events in urban creeks

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Human Bacteroides and total coliforms as indicators of recent combined sewer overflows and rain events in urban creeks
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, July 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.108
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shannon McGinnis, Susan Spencer, Aaron Firnstahl, Joel Stokdyk, Mark Borchardt, David T. McCarthy, Heather M. Murphy

Abstract

Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are a known source of human fecal pollution and human pathogens in urban water bodies, which may present a significant public health threat. To monitor human fecal contamination in water, bacterial fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) are traditionally used. However, because FIOs are not specific to human sources and do not correlate with human pathogens, alternative fecal indicators detected using qPCR are becoming of interest to policymakers. For this reason, this study measured correlations between the number and duration of CSOs and mm of rainfall, concentrations of traditional FIOs and alternative indicators, and the presence of human pathogens in two urban creeks. Samples were collected May-July 2016 and analyzed for concentrations of FIOs (total coliforms and E. coli) using membrane filtration as well as for three alternative fecal indicators (human Bacteroides HF183 marker, human polyomavirus (HPoV), pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV)) and nine human pathogens using qPCR. Four of the nine pathogens analyzed were detected at these sites including adenovirus, Enterohemorrhagic E. coli, norovirus, and Salmonella. Among all indicators studied, human Bacteroides and total coliforms were significantly correlated with recent CSO and rainfall events, while E. coli, PMMoV, and HPoV did not show consistent significant correlations. Further, human Bacteroides were a more specific indicator, while total coliforms were a more sensitive indicator of CSO and rainfall events. Results may have implications for the use and interpretation of these indicators in future policy or monitoring programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 18%
Researcher 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Other 3 5%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 17 28%
Engineering 8 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 13 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,998,847
of 15,557,767 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#7,155
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,512
of 279,336 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#183
of 456 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,767 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,336 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 456 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.