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Shifting stream planform state decreases stream productivity yet increases riparian animal production

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, March 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Shifting stream planform state decreases stream productivity yet increases riparian animal production
Published in
Oecologia, March 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00442-018-4106-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael P. Venarsky, David M. Walters, Robert O. Hall, Bridget Livers, Ellen Wohl

Abstract

In the Colorado Front Range (USA), disturbance history dictates stream planform. Undisturbed, old-growth streams have multiple channels and large amounts of wood and depositional habitat. Disturbed streams (wildfires and logging < 200 years ago) are single-channeled with mostly erosional habitat. We tested how these opposing stream states influenced organic matter, benthic macroinvertebrate secondary production, emerging aquatic insect flux, and riparian spider biomass. Organic matter and macroinvertebrate production did not differ among sites per unit area (m-2), but values were 2 ×-21 × higher in undisturbed reaches per unit of stream valley (m-1 valley) because total stream area was higher in undisturbed reaches. Insect emergence was similar among streams at the per unit area and per unit of stream valley. However, rescaling insect emergence to per meter of stream bank showed that the emerging insect biomass reaching the stream bank was lower in undisturbed sites because multi-channel reaches had 3 × more stream bank than single-channel reaches. Riparian spider biomass followed the same pattern as emerging aquatic insects, and we attribute this to bottom-up limitation caused by the multi-channeled undisturbed sites diluting prey quantity (emerging insects) reaching the stream bank (riparian spider habitat). These results show that historic landscape disturbances continue to influence stream and riparian communities in the Colorado Front Range. However, these legacy effects are only weakly influencing habitat-specific function and instead are primarily influencing stream-riparian community productivity by dictating both stream planform (total stream area, total stream bank length) and the proportional distribution of specific habitat types (pools vs riffles).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Professor 4 7%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 19 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 25%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 9%
Engineering 3 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 14 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2018.
All research outputs
#4,412,571
of 16,566,910 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#1,122
of 3,833 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,238
of 282,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#28
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,566,910 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,833 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,515 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.