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The role of atorvastatin in suppressing tumor growth of uterine fibroids

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2018
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Title
The role of atorvastatin in suppressing tumor growth of uterine fibroids
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12967-018-1430-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhaojun Shen, Saisai Li, Bo Sheng, Qi Shen, Lu-Zhe Sun, Haiyan Zhu, Xueqiong Zhu

Abstract

Medical therapeutic options remain quite limited for uterine fibroids treatment. Statins, competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, have anti-tumoral effects on multiple cancer types, however, little is known about their effects on uterine fibroids. Initially, we conducted a retrospective study of 120 patients with uterine fibroids and hyperlipidemia from the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. Then, we evaluated the effect of atorvastatin on proliferation and apoptosis both in immortalized uterine fibroids cells and primary uterine fibroids cells. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism by which atorvastatin suppressed uterine fibroids cell growth was explored. Our results showed that atorvastatin use for 1 or 2 years significantly suppressed growth of uterine fibroids. Atorvastatin inhibited the proliferation of immortalized and primary uterine fibroids cells in a dose and time-dependent manner and stimulated apoptosis of uterine fibroids cells by inducing caspase-3 activation, up-regulating Bim and down-regulating Bcl-2. Additionally, atorvastatin treatment suppressed phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK. Furthermore, GGPP, a downstream lipid isoprenoid intermediate, significantly rescued the effect of atorvastatin. These results suggest that atorvastatin exerts anti-tumoral effects on uterine fibroids through inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in HMG-CoA-dependent pathway. Our results provide the first clinical and preclinical data on the use of atorvastatin as a promising nonsurgical treatment option for uterine fibroids.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 25%
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Unknown 5 42%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Engineering 1 8%
Unknown 7 58%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2019.
All research outputs
#10,713,516
of 14,098,389 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#2,124
of 2,734 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,886
of 276,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,098,389 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,734 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them