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Warm Arctic episodes linked with increased frequency of extreme winter weather in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 22,486)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
77 news outlets
blogs
20 blogs
twitter
802 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
4 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
Title
Warm Arctic episodes linked with increased frequency of extreme winter weather in the United States
Published in
Nature Communications, March 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-02992-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Judah Cohen, Karl Pfeiffer, Jennifer A. Francis

Abstract

Recent boreal winters have exhibited a large-scale seesaw temperature pattern characterized by an unusually warm Arctic and cold continents. Whether there is any physical link between Arctic variability and Northern Hemisphere (NH) extreme weather is an active area of research. Using a recently developed index of severe winter weather, we show that the occurrence of severe winter weather in the United States is significantly related to anomalies in pan-Arctic geopotential heights and temperatures. As the Arctic transitions from a relatively cold state to a warmer one, the frequency of severe winter weather in mid-latitudes increases through the transition. However, this relationship is strongest in the eastern US and mixed to even opposite along the western US. We also show that during mid-winter to late-winter of recent decades, when the Arctic warming trend is greatest and extends into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, severe winter weather-including both cold spells and heavy snows-became more frequent in the eastern United States.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 802 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 112 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 33 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 21%
Student > Bachelor 17 15%
Student > Master 11 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 5%
Other 21 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 48 43%
Environmental Science 29 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 10%
Unspecified 10 9%
Chemistry 3 3%
Other 11 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1314. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,957
of 12,987,514 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#28
of 22,486 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117
of 270,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,987,514 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 22,486 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,662 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them