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Effects of iota-carrageenan on ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection in vitro and in vivo

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Applied Phycology, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of iota-carrageenan on ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection in vitro and in vivo
Published in
Journal of Applied Phycology, March 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10811-018-1435-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aleksandra Inic-Kanada, Elisabeth Stein, Marijana Stojanovic, Nadine Schuerer, Ehsan Ghasemian, Ana Filipovic, Emilija Marinkovic, Dejana Kosanovic, Talin Barisani-Asenbauer

Abstract

Ocular chlamydial infections with the ocular serovars A, B, Ba, and C of Chlamydia trachomatis represent the world's leading cause of infectious blindness. Carrageenans are naturally occurring, sulfated polysaccharides generally considered safe for food and topical applications. Carrageenans can inhibit infection caused by a variety of viruses and bacteria. To investigate whether iota-carrageenan (I-C) isolated from the red alga Chondrus crispus could prevent ocular chlamydial infection, we assessed if targeted treatment of the conjunctival mucosa with I-C affects chlamydial attachment, entry, and replication in the host cell. Immortalized human conjunctival epithelial cells were treated with I-C prior to C. trachomatis infection and analyzed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. In vivo effects were evaluated in an ocular guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis model. Ocular pathology was graded daily, and chlamydial clearance was investigated. Our study showed that I-C reduces the infectivity of C. trachomatis in vitro. In vivo results showed a slight reduced ocular pathology and significantly less shedding of infectious elementary bodies by infected animals. Our results indicate that I-C could be a promising agent to reduce the transmission of ocular chlamydial infection and opens perspectives to develop prophylactic approaches to block C. trachomatis entry into the host cell.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Researcher 3 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 15 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 15 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2018.
All research outputs
#6,555,647
of 20,881,490 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Applied Phycology
#379
of 2,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,779
of 295,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Applied Phycology
#7
of 114 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,881,490 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,515 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,986 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 114 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.