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Dark zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet controlled by distributed biologically-active impurities

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
479 X users
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

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97 Dimensions

Readers on

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146 Mendeley
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Title
Dark zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet controlled by distributed biologically-active impurities
Published in
Nature Communications, March 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-03353-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan C. Ryan, Alun Hubbard, Marek Stibal, Tristram D. Irvine-Fynn, Joseph Cook, Laurence C. Smith, Karen Cameron, Jason Box

Abstract

Albedo-a primary control on surface melt-varies considerably across the Greenland Ice Sheet yet the specific surface types that comprise its dark zone remain unquantified. Here we use UAV imagery to attribute seven distinct surface types to observed albedo along a 25 km transect dissecting the western, ablating sector of the ice sheet. Our results demonstrate that distributed surface impurities-an admixture of dust, black carbon and pigmented algae-explain 73% of the observed spatial variability in albedo and are responsible for the dark zone itself. Crevassing and supraglacial water also drive albedo reduction but due to their limited extent, explain just 12 and 15% of the observed variability respectively. Cryoconite, concentrated in large holes or fluvial deposits, is the darkest surface type but accounts for <1% of the area and has minimal impact. We propose that the ongoing emergence and dispersal of distributed impurities, amplified by enhanced ablation and biological activity, will drive future expansion of Greenland's dark zone.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 479 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 146 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 26%
Researcher 29 20%
Student > Master 15 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 6%
Professor 6 4%
Other 13 9%
Unknown 36 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 52 36%
Environmental Science 24 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Engineering 4 3%
Other 11 8%
Unknown 40 27%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 420. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2024.
All research outputs
#71,932
of 26,169,168 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#1,116
of 60,104 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,721
of 355,661 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#33
of 1,225 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,169,168 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 60,104 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 55.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,661 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,225 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.