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Transcriptome analysis of pig intestinal cell monolayers infected with Cryptosporidium parvum asexual stages

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, March 2018
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Title
Transcriptome analysis of pig intestinal cell monolayers infected with Cryptosporidium parvum asexual stages
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13071-018-2754-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marzieh Ezzaty Mirhashemi, Farzad Noubary, Susan Chapman-Bonofiglio, Saul Tzipori, Gordon S. Huggins, Giovanni Widmer

Abstract

Human cryptosporidiosis is caused primarily by two species of apicomplexan protozoa, Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis. In cultured cell monolayers, the parasite undergoes two generations of asexual multiplication (merogony). However, the proportion of parasites completing the life-cycle is low and insufficient to sustain continuous propagation. Due to the intracellular location of meronts and later life-cycle stages, oocyst and sporozoites are the only forms of the parasite that can readily be isolated. Research on the replicating forms of Cryptosporidium parasites and their interaction with the host cell remains challenging. Based on an RNA-Seq analysis of monolayers of pig epithelial cells infected with C. parvum, here we report on the impact of merogony on the host's gene regulation. Analysis of the transcriptome of infected and uninfected monolayers demonstrates a significant impact of the infection on host cell gene expression. A total of 813 genes were differentially expressed. Functional terms significantly altered in response to infection include phosphoprotein, RNA binding and acetylation. Upregulation of cell cycle pathways indicates an increase in mitosis. Notably absent from differentially enriched functional categories are stress- and apoptosis-related functions. The comparison of the combined host-parasite transcriptome reveals that C. parvum gene expression is less diverse than the host cell transcriptome and is highly enriched for genes encoding ribosomal functions, such as ribosomal proteins. These results indicate that C. parvum infection significantly changes host biological functions and provide new insight into gene functions driving early C. parvum intracellular development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 42%
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Unspecified 2 17%
Researcher 1 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 33%
Unspecified 3 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 25%
Computer Science 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,073,016
of 13,411,977 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,825
of 3,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,087
of 272,048 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,411,977 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,567 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,048 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them