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miR-15a and miR-16 Are Implicated in Cell Cycle Regulation in a Rb-Dependent Manner and Are Frequently Deleted or Down-regulated in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, July 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
31 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
332 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
152 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
miR-15a and miR-16 Are Implicated in Cell Cycle Regulation in a Rb-Dependent Manner and Are Frequently Deleted or Down-regulated in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer
Published in
Cancer Research, July 2009
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-08-4277
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nora Bandi, Samuel Zbinden, Mathias Gugger, Marlene Arnold, Verena Kocher, Lara Hasan, Andreas Kappeler, Thomas Brunner, Erik Vassella

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNA) are negative regulators of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, which are involved in tumorigenesis. Two miRNAs, miR-15a and miR-16, which are located at chromosome 13q14, have been implicated in cell cycle control and apoptosis, but little information is available about their role in solid tumors. To address this question, we established a protocol to quantify miRNAs from laser capture microdissected tissues. Here, we show that miR-15a/miR-16 are frequently deleted or down-regulated in squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas of the lung. In these tumors, expression of miR-15a/miR-16 inversely correlates with the expression of cyclin D1. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, cyclins D1, D2, and E1 are directly regulated by physiologic concentrations of miR-15a/miR-16. Consistent with these results, overexpression of these miRNAs induces cell cycle arrest in G(1)-G(0). Interestingly, H2009 cells lacking Rb are resistant to miR-15a/miR-16-induced cell cycle arrest, whereas reintroduction of functional Rb resensitizes these cells to miRNA activity. In contrast, down-regulation of Rb in A549 cells by RNA interference confers resistance to these miRNAs. Thus, cell cycle arrest induced by these miRNAs depends on the expression of Rb, confirming that G(1) cyclins are major targets of miR-15a/miR-16 in NSCLC. Our results indicate that miR-15a/miR-16 are implicated in cell cycle control and likely contribute to the tumorigenesis of NSCLC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 31 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 152 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 5%
Germany 2 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 135 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 25%
Researcher 30 20%
Student > Master 18 12%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 7%
Other 28 18%
Unknown 10 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 19%
Engineering 4 3%
Computer Science 3 2%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 17 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2022.
All research outputs
#1,576,671
of 22,961,203 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#1,082
of 17,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,085
of 110,570 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#10
of 143 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,961,203 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,936 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 110,570 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 143 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.