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Feasibility and acceptability of a brief online self-compassion intervention for mothers of infants

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Women's Mental Health, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 540)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
37 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Feasibility and acceptability of a brief online self-compassion intervention for mothers of infants
Published in
Archives of Women's Mental Health, March 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00737-018-0829-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy E. Mitchell, Koa Whittingham, Stanley Steindl, James Kirby

Abstract

To evaluate the acceptability and potential utility of a small package of online resources designed to improve self-compassion for mothers of infants. A within-groups repeated-measures study design was used. A community sample of 262 mothers who were ≤ 24 months post-partum were given access to a set of online resources (two videos plus a tip sheet) that outlined simple techniques for increasing self-compassion drawn from compassion-focused therapy (CFT). Participants completed pre-intervention assessment, followed by post-intervention assessment 1 month later. Assessment included self-report measures of self-compassion, psychological flexibility and shame in the mothering role; symptoms of post-traumatic stress (PTS) following childbirth; subjective breastfeeding experience; and satisfaction with infant feeding. Overall, 49.8% of participants accessed some or all of the resources, with lack of time the most common barrier to use. The vast majority (96%) agreed that self-compassion is helpful for women experiencing birth or breastfeeding difficulties. t tests examined change in scores from pre- to post-intervention, indicating increases in self-compassion, decreases in PTS symptoms (intrusion, hyperarousal and total PTS score) and improved subjective breastfeeding experience as well as overall satisfaction with breastfeeding. There were no changes in scores for psychological flexibility, shame, or satisfaction with general infant feeding. This pilot study supports the acceptability and potential utility of self-compassion resources, drawn from CFT, to support mothers' well-being in the first years of their baby's life. This novel approach to maternal health intervention warrants further exploration, development and testing in future research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 37 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 33%
Unspecified 12 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 38%
Unspecified 14 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2018.
All research outputs
#533,578
of 12,361,048 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Women's Mental Health
#25
of 540 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,694
of 312,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Women's Mental Health
#1
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,361,048 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 540 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 312,260 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.