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3.4 million real-world learning management system logins reveal the majority of students experience social jet lag correlated with decreased performance

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
67 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
365 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
118 Mendeley
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Title
3.4 million real-world learning management system logins reveal the majority of students experience social jet lag correlated with decreased performance
Published in
Scientific Reports, March 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-23044-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin L. Smarr, Aaron E. Schirmer

Abstract

Misalignments between endogenous circadian rhythms and the built environment (i.e., social jet lag, SJL) result in learning and attention deficits. Currently, there is no way to assess the impact of SJL on learning outcomes of large populations as a response to schedule choices, let alone to assess which individuals are most negatively impacted by these choices. We analyzed two years of learning management system login events for 14,894 Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU) students to investigate the capacity of such systems as tools for mapping the impact of SJL over large populations while maintaining the ability to generate insights about individuals. Personal daily activity profiles were validated against known biological timing effects, and revealed a majority of students experience more than 30 minutes of SJL on average, with greater amplitude correlating strongly with a significant decrease in academic performance, especially in people with later apparent chronotypes. Our findings demonstrate that online records can be used to map individual- and population-level SJL, allow deep mining for patterns across demographics, and could guide schedule choices in an effort to minimize SJL's negative impact on learning outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 365 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 118 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 15%
Student > Bachelor 17 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 13%
Researcher 14 12%
Lecturer 8 7%
Other 21 18%
Unknown 25 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 13%
Psychology 10 8%
Neuroscience 10 8%
Computer Science 8 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 6%
Other 39 33%
Unknown 29 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 791. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2021.
All research outputs
#15,564
of 20,040,745 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#245
of 106,492 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#439
of 295,665 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,040,745 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 106,492 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,665 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them