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Earthworm-induced shifts in microbial diversity in soils with rare versus established invasive earthworm populations

Overview of attention for article published in FEMS Microbiology Ecology, March 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Earthworm-induced shifts in microbial diversity in soils with rare versus established invasive earthworm populations
Published in
FEMS Microbiology Ecology, March 2018
DOI 10.1093/femsec/fiy051
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexandre B de Menezes, Miranda T Prendergast-Miller, Lynne M Macdonald, Peter Toscas, Geoff Baker, Mark Farrell, Tim Wark, Alan E Richardson, Peter H Thrall

Abstract

European earthworms have colonised many parts of Australia, although their impact on soil microbial communities remains largely uncharacterised. An experiment was conducted to contrast the responses to Aporrectodea trapezoides introduction between soils from sites with established (Talmo, 64 A. trapezoides m-2) and rare (Glenrock, 0.6 A. trapezoides m-2) A. trapezoides populations. Our hypothesis was that earthworm introduction would lead to similar changes in bacterial communities in both soils. The effects of earthworm introduction (earthworm activity and cadaver decomposition) did not lead to a convergence of bacterial community composition between the two soils. However, in both soils, the Firmicutes decreased in abundance and a common set of bacteria responded positively to earthworms. The increase in the abundance of Flavobacterium, Chitinophagaceae, Rhodocyclaceae and Sphingobacteriales were consistent with previous studies. Evidence for possible soil resistance to earthworms was observed, with lower earthworm survival in Glenrock microcosms coinciding with A. trapezoides rarity in this site, lower soil organic matter and clay content and differences in the diversity and abundance of potential earthworm mutualist bacteria. These results suggest that while the impacts of earthworms vary between different soils, the consistent response of some bacteria may aid in predicting the impacts of earthworms on soil ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 48%
Environmental Science 3 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Engineering 1 4%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2018.
All research outputs
#7,269,587
of 13,906,652 outputs
Outputs from FEMS Microbiology Ecology
#857
of 1,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,205
of 276,879 outputs
Outputs of similar age from FEMS Microbiology Ecology
#42
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,906,652 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,374 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,879 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.