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A Link Between Childhood Adversity and Trait Anger Reflects Relative Activity of the Amygdala and Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, July 2018
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Title
A Link Between Childhood Adversity and Trait Anger Reflects Relative Activity of the Amygdala and Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex
Published in
Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, July 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.03.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Justin Kim, Matthew A. Scult, Annchen R. Knodt, Spenser R. Radtke, Tracy C. d’Arbeloff, Bartholomew D. Brigidi, Ahmad R. Hariri

Abstract

Trait anger, or the dispositional tendency to experience a wide range of situations as annoying or frustrating, is associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes. The experience of adversity during childhood is one risk factor for the later emergence of high trait anger. This association has been hypothesized to reflect alterations in neural circuits supporting bottom-up threat processing and top-down executive control. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging and self-report questionnaire data from 220 volunteers, we examined how individual differences in top-down prefrontal executive control and bottom-up amygdala threat activity modulate the association between childhood adversity and trait anger during young adulthood. We report that the association between childhood adversity and trait anger is attenuated specifically in young adults who have both relatively low threat-related amygdala activity and high executive control-related dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity. These brain activity patterns suggest that simultaneous consideration of their underlying cognitive processes-namely, threat processing and executive control-may be useful in strategies designed to mitigate the negative mental health consequences of childhood adversity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 40%
Student > Master 5 33%
Other 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Researcher 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 53%
Psychology 2 13%
Neuroscience 2 13%
Sports and Recreations 1 7%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,354,805
of 13,568,727 outputs
Outputs from Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
#234
of 308 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,689
of 271,443 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
#15
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,568,727 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 308 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.1. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,443 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.