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CRISPR Recognition Tool (CRT): a tool for automatic detection of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Bioinformatics, January 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

patent
1 patent
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
285 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
334 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
2 Connotea
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Title
CRISPR Recognition Tool (CRT): a tool for automatic detection of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats
Published in
BMC Bioinformatics, January 2007
DOI 10.1186/1471-2105-8-209
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charles Bland, Teresa L Ramsey, Fareedah Sabree, Micheal Lowe, Kyndall Brown, Nikos C Kyrpides, Philip Hugenholtz

Abstract

Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel type of direct repeat found in a wide range of bacteria and archaea. CRISPRs are beginning to attract attention because of their proposed mechanism; that is, defending their hosts against invading extrachromosomal elements such as viruses. Existing repeat detection tools do a poor job of identifying CRISPRs due to the presence of unique spacer sequences separating the repeats. In this study, a new tool, CRT, is introduced that rapidly and accurately identifies CRISPRs in large DNA strings, such as genomes and metagenomes.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 334 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 11 3%
Netherlands 3 <1%
Australia 3 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 2 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Belgium 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Other 6 2%
Unknown 301 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 95 28%
Researcher 80 24%
Student > Master 57 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 23 7%
Student > Bachelor 22 7%
Other 57 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 191 57%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 70 21%
Unspecified 16 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 15 4%
Computer Science 12 4%
Other 30 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2014.
All research outputs
#2,150,029
of 12,373,386 outputs
Outputs from BMC Bioinformatics
#975
of 4,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,895
of 268,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Bioinformatics
#16
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,386 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,576 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,055 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.